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Name Marco Von Ballmoos
Member since
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Home page http://earthli.com/users/marco
Description

The (only) developer at earthli.com.

Contents

2646 Articles
101 Comments

7 months Ago

Fuck around and find out in Asia

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

Since the Biden Administration took the reins, America’s foreign policy has stayed just as confusing as under Trump (or Obama or Bush…) but is arguably more strident and belligerent.

I write “Biden Administration” because am reluctant to characterize anything that happens as having sprung from the mind of Biden. His few appearances and utterances have not inspired any confidence that he’s deciding anything more complex than which kind of fruit he wants for breakfast. On the other hand, the... [More]

8 months Ago

CSS and HTML Toolbox 2021

Published on in Programming

Over the last four months, I’ve been collecting interesting HTML/CSS techniques and ideas.

  1. I’m planning a bit of a make-over of the earthli style and stylesheets to replace some older cruft with more modern, simpler implementations.
  2. I’m planning a new curriculum for the JavaScript class I’ll be teaching again this coming winter.

For both of these goals, I’m focusing on leveraging as much of the power of the browser—especially CSS/HTML—as possible without getting mired in too much... [More]

Configuring and using Jetbrains Rider ...021.1.1 and Visual Studio 2019 16.9.4

Published on in Programming

Visual Studio with ReSharper has been my main development tool for many, many years. I first started using it in 2008 or 2009.

Over the last several years, I’ve used many other IDEs, like Visual Studio Code for documentation, advanced search, and JavaScript/TypeScript or PHPStorm for PHP, Android Studio for Java/Android, XCode for Swift/iOS, or WebStorm for TypeScript/JavaScript.

JetBrains Rider came on the scene several years ago and was not, at first, a viable alternative, but it has gotten... [More]

Arsène Lupin, gentleman-cambrioleur ...ice Leblanc (1907; fr) (read in 2021)

Published on in Books

Disclaimer: these are notes I took while reading this book. They include citations I found interesting or enlightening or particularly well-written. In some cases, I’ve pointed out which of these applies to which citation; in others, I have not. Any benefit you gain from reading these notes is purely incidental to the purpose they serve of reminding me what I once read. Please see Wikipedia for a summary if I’ve failed to provide one sufficient for your purposes. If my notes serve to trigger an... [More]

Links and Notes for April 16th, 2021

Published on in Notes

Below are links to articles, highlighted passages[1], and occasional annotations[2] for the week ending on the date in the title, enriching the raw data from Instapaper Likes and Twitter. They are intentionally succinct, else they’d be articles and probably end up in the gigantic backlog of unpublished drafts. YMMV.

[1] Emphases are added, unless otherwise noted.
[2] Annotations are only lightly edited.

COVID-19

Governments are constitutionally permitted to provide ‘vaccine passports’ – some may... [More] by Kevin Cope and Alexander Stremitzer

On Pissing Contests

Published on in Miscellaneous

I read an article called on Matt Taibbi, Gogol, and Cancel Culture by Evgenia Kovda (Immigrants as a Weapon), which I’d gotten to because it’s actually Yasha Levine’s SubStack and his wife is sharing it with him. She wrote about Matt Taibbi,

“Makes one think about all this cancel culture outrage that you’re manically producing these days. You constantly write about how dangerous this new wave of censorship is to art and culture and speech and self-expression, and how stifling it is. But Gogol — your literary hero — proves the... [More]”

John Oliver vs. Tucker Carlson

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

John Oliver addresses the menace of Tucker Carlson in the video. It’s a pretty cheap takedown in that the charges of white supremacism are fraught and Oliver relies nearly exclusively on older clips (some from the 90s, for God’s sake). Carlson is on TV every night of the week. Did you have to reach back to the 90s to find sufficiently incriminating material?

I’m surprised the Oliver didn’t point out that Carlson’s “concentrating” face resembles a constipated weasel.

Tucker Carlson by Last Week Tonight (YouTube)

John Oliver, once again,... [More]

Joe Biden’s first press conference

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

I watched this on the Katie Halper podcast, but Taibbi and Halper’s MST2000-like chatter didn’t really add anything (this time). You can probably find the real thing on C-SPAN or something, but the time-marks I made line up with this version, so I’m using that as a reference.

Biden's First Press Conference by Katie Halper and Matt Taibbi (YouTube)

14:00
Start of a looooong immigration discussion, but he’s mostly reading. The questions are prepared. The reporters have been pre-selected. He keeps checking his notes to see where he is in the list.
28:30
Let’s go... [More]

The persistence of genocide

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

Is China Committing Genocide? Behind the US Government’s Propaganda Campaign by Dan Cohen (MintPress News)

Is China Committing Genocide? Behind The US Government’s Propaganda Campaign by Dan Cohen (YouTube)

“Meanwhile, Zenz’s study accusing China of forced sterilizations didn’t contain any proof of coercion. The Grayzone showed how “Zenz consistently framed the expansion of public healthcare services in Xinjiang as evidence of a genocide in the making.” Characterizing expanded access to birth control as genocide is what the Christian Right does. So it makes perfect sense that Zenz – an evangelical... [More]”

Apple vs. Russia

Published on in Technology

Apple bent its rules for Russia—and other countries will take note by Lily Hay Newman (Ars Technica)

“Questions remain about whether Russia’s end goal is to completely isolate and disconnect its Internet from the wider world or whether the government prefers a hybrid network. But from the Kremlin’s perspective, the opportunity to promote certain apps on iOS is a boon either way.

“Apple could have simply allowed Russia to pre-install whatever apps it wanted on iOS devices, but the company also could have taken a radical... [More]”

Is COVID-19 really over in the west?

Published on in Science & Nature

Biden recently informed the nation that things would be back to normal by July 4th—as if the virus cares.

Biden peddles national self-delusion on pandemic anniversary by Patrick Martin (WSWS)

“The language of collective loss, suffering and sacrifice, however, ignored the brutal fact that one section of American society, the super-rich, has lost nothing at all from 12 months of the worst pandemic in a century.

“While 527,000 Americans died, the billionaires increased their wealth by $1.4 trillion. While the economy... [More]”

Matt Stoller on Useful Idiots: Tech Revenue Model and Taiwan

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

This is a Useful Idiots interview with the always interesting and provactive Matt Stoller. It’s the second part of an interview with that began in New Useful Idiots: Ted Cruz, Penis Mishaps, and Matt Stoller on Big Tech Monopoly (Audio Also). I’ve highlighted and partially transcribed the bits I found interesting. The Substack page has more transcription (but it’s also only partial).

Substack Only Episode of Useful Idiots: Guest Matt Stoller asks, 'Is the Left Interested in National Defense?' Plus, Matt and Katie Discuss Mr. Biden's Wild Stair Ride by Useful Idiots (YouTube)

At 03:00, Stoller talks about how we need to turn our tech giants back into platforms instead of purveyors of... [More]

Carl Zha on the Chinese Summit (Behind the Headlines)

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

I’d never heard of Carl Zha before, but he was entertaining and informative on U.S.-China relations. This is a 1-hour interview about various China-related topics.

Video: US Escalates New Cold War as Diplomatic Gloves Come Off, with Carl Zha by Behind the Headlines (YouTube)

I am not kidding. The U.S. lectured China at their latest summit with this gem:

“A confident country is able to look hard at its own shortcomings and constantly seek to improve. And that is the secret sauce of America.”

I wouldn’t even have known how to respond to that. The Idiocracy is fully bloomed.

The Chinese diplomat... [More]

Boogaloo = Boogie Man

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

The article Meet the Censored: Live Streamers by Matt Taibbi (SubStack) includes a description of what the Boogaloos are like when you actually bother to cover them and ask them what they stand for (instead of just triggering on CNN’s description of them).

“According to Fischer, the Twitter announcement didn’t exactly make sense, because the protesters in Ohio were more of a libertarian ilk, and, as Farina and Chariton discovered in the Virginia crowd, not so clearly aligned with Trump as Twitter and other media... [More]”

Muddling through the misinformation

Published on in Science & Nature

The article CDC study finds c. 78% of people hospitalized for COVID were overweight or obese by Mark Crispin Miller contains the following text and the link below it.

“A study from the CDC, reported by CNBC, and yet it slipped right down the memory hole, despite—or because of—the further light it sheds on the entire COVID narrative, which has millions of slim, healthy people tightly masked and terrified of human contact.”

The article he linked, CDC study finds about 78% of people hospitalized for Covid were... [More] by Berkeley Lovelace Jr. (CNBC)

Reporting on the democrats

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

Something happened with this video. It’s still on YouTube, but Lee Camp has redacted it from his own web site. I’d originally watched it at MOC #67 − The Truth About DSA & AOC (w/ Eric London) (LeeCamp.Com), but that link is dead now. Episode #67 is conspicuously absent from the listings on that site. I’m a bit taken aback that Camp took the video down without explanation.

MOC #67 − The Truth About DSA & AOC (w/ Eric London) by Lee Camp (YouTube)

Eric London is much better in this interview than in print, but he cannot help but purity-test everyone. He mentions Jacobin... [More]

Drosten and Osterholm in Einklang

Published on in Science & Nature

Coronavirus-Update #82: Die Lage ist ernst by NDR Ratgeber (YouTube)

Drosten’s pissed. I’ve heard “irreführende” about 90 times now. He thinks there are two options: let it rip and collapse the health system or go back into lockdown (“der Holzhammer”) … Germany doesn’t seem capable of doing anything in between.

He said “private Kontakte” are definitely where infections are coming from now. It’s no longer true that “wir wissen einfach nicht wovon die Infectionen kommen…”

At 37:30, he said

“Bei keinem diesen Viren gibt es eine “Dauerwelle”. Der Begriff “der... [More]”

Capsule Movie Reviews Vol.2021.3

Published on in Movies

These are my notes to remember what I watched and kinda what I thought about it. I’ve recently transferred my reviews to IMDb and made the list of around 1600 ratings publicly available. I’ve included the individual ratings with my notes for each movie. These ratings are not absolutely comparable to each other—I rate the film on how well it suited me for the genre and my mood and. let’s be honest, level of intoxication. YMMV. Also, I make no attempt to avoid spoilers.

The Man in the High... [More]

Links and Notes for April 9th, 2021

Published on in Notes

Below are links to articles, highlighted passages[1], and occasional annotations[2] for the week ending on the date in the title, enriching the raw data from Instapaper Likes and Twitter. They are intentionally succinct, else they’d be articles and probably end up in the gigantic backlog of unpublished drafts. YMMV.

[1] Emphases are added, unless otherwise noted.
[2] Annotations are only lightly edited.

COVID-19

Coronavirus-Update #82: Die Lage ist ernst by NDR Ratgeber (YouTube)

Drosten’s pissed. I’ve heard “irreführende” about 90 times now. He thinks there are two... [More]

Links and Notes for April 2nd, 2021

Published on in Notes

Below are links to articles, highlighted passages[1], and occasional annotations[2] for the week ending on the date in the title, enriching the raw data from Instapaper Likes and Twitter. They are intentionally succinct, else they’d be articles and probably end up in the gigantic backlog of unpublished drafts. YMMV.

[1] Emphases are added, unless otherwise noted.
[2] Annotations are only lightly edited.

COVID-19

Facemasks in the COVID-19 era: A health hypothesis (National Center for Biotechnology Information)

“Many countries across the globe utilized... [More]”

Links and Notes for March 26th, 2021

Published on in Notes

Below are links to articles, highlighted passages[1], and occasional annotations[2] for the week ending on the date in the title, enriching the raw data from Instapaper Likes and Twitter. They are intentionally succinct, else they’d be articles and probably end up in the gigantic backlog of unpublished drafts. YMMV.

[1] Emphases are added, unless otherwise noted.
[2] Annotations are only lightly edited.

COVID-19

Brasilien ist eine Gefahr für die Weltgesundheit by Fee Anabelle Riebeling (20min)

Although I don’t recall seeing a similar... [More]

Set a Git Tag on Azure

Published on in Programming

As with installing a dotnet tool on Azure, there isn’t a standard task for setting a Git tag from a pipeline YAML configuration. The Pipeline UI has an option to easily do this, but that hasn’t translated to a task yet, nor does it look like it’s likely to, according to online discussions.

Setting a Git tag is relatively straightforward, but is complicated by permissions (as with installing a dotnet tool. To tag a build, you have to just execute the git commands in a script.

  − task:... [More]

Installing a dotnet tool on Azure

Published on in Programming

I have a .NET solution (Quino) that contains a project that I publish as a `dotnet` tool. The tool calculates a version number based on the branch and version number found in the solution. I use it from Quino itself and also from other project pipelines.

In order to use it from any pipeline (including Quino itself), I need to install it from the Quino artifact feed. The original solution is a couple of years old: I’d had a secure file for NuGet.Config that included the PAT. This works fine,... [More]

A couple of interviews with Adam Curtis

Published on in Philosophy

The following video is an excellent interview by Chapo in which they just let him talk. The documentary they discuss is his most recent one, Can’t Get You Out of My Head (the link is to a YouTube playlist of all 4 hours in 4 videos. The videos were published by “Adam Curtis Documentary” and were aired on the BBC, so there’s a good change that they’ll survive.

502 − Units of One feat. Adam Curtis by Chapo Trap House on March 03, 2021 (YouTube)

Curtis did another interview in Can’t Get You Out of My Head w/ Adam Curtis by Red Scare that was just as good. The discussion were similar—they... [More]

Jacobin Interview with Vijay Prashad

Published on in Public Policy & Politics

This interview with Vijay Prashad is really quite good. He provides interesting information and views on Indian and Chinese politics.

Biden's Corporate Unity, Taylor Guitar Co-Op, & Indian Farmers' Protest w/ Vijay Prashad by Jacobin Weekends (YouTube)

At 44:39, Nando does a good deep-dive/description of of worker-owned companies.

Nando: If you really boil it down to its essence, politics is about who gets what in our society. As Marx said: it is a struggle between capital and labor. Capitalists—or the bourgeoisie—are the people who own things , or land. Labor are those people who do the work, in... [More]”

The zero-risk society is a strawman

Published on in Finance & Economy

I recently read the article Stop Trying To Create a Zero-Risk Society by Veronique de Rugy (Reason), which included the following infuriating citation.

“Yet, as economist Steve Horowitz recently wrote to me on Facebook, “The reality is that we can never achieve” a zero-risk society, and “the costs of trying to are enormous, in terms of both material resources and human freedom.””

Honestly, just fucking knock it off. Nobody wants a zero-risk society. We just want to maybe not have a high-risk society because all the fucking... [More]

Bubble Living

Published on in Finance & Economy

The article ECB to accelerate supply of ultra-cheap money by Nick Beams (WSWS) describes the main reason the U.S.—and the world—economy doesn’t seem to have noticed any downside in the last year and a half, despite the most devastating pandemic in living memory.

“It seems that whatever the state of the economy, the response of central banks is the same: pour more money into the financial system, so that investors and speculators can continue to make vast profits on the basis of ultra-low interest rates.

“When... [More]”

9 months Ago

Links and Notes for March 19th, 2021

Published on in Notes

Below are links to articles, highlighted passages[1], and occasional annotations[2] for the week ending on the date in the title, enriching the raw data from Instapaper Likes and Twitter. They are intentionally succinct, else they’d be articles and probably end up in the gigantic backlog of unpublished drafts. YMMV.

[1] Emphases are added, unless otherwise noted.
[2] Annotations are only lightly edited.

COVID-19

European Medicines Agency continues to endorse the safety of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine by Benjamin Mateus (WSWS)

... [More]

A nice CSS demo that uses 350% CPU

Published on in Programming

The article Getting the Mouse Position using CSS by Bramus talks about a neat trick that uses sibling elements to react to mouse events without using JavaScript. It also features some kick-ass translucency and animation effects with CSS transitions.

As you move the cursor around, the layer of “cells” change X and Y positions that the CSS text elements “watch”. This lets the central elements “follow” the mouse, transforming a stack of “CSS” texts in a nicely composed and layered stack. It looks like... [More]

You just don’t get it, man

Published on in Quotes

The article ”That’s Why It’s Poetry” by Eugene Volokh (Reason) commemorates the recent death of Lawrence Ferlinghetti with a wonderful story, not directly about Ferlinghetti, but about one expert witness’s testimony at his trial for obscenity for having published Howl. It wasn’t so long ago in America that people were being prosecuted for obscenity.

That trial was in 1957. Just over 60 years later and it seems kind of far-fetched to think we may see the like again. The goal is to sanction unsanctioned[1] ideas, to keep... [More]