|<<>>|4 of 211 Show listMobile Mode

Im Westen nichts Neues by Erich Maria Remarque (1929; read in 2020)

Published by marco on

Disclaimer: these are notes I took while reading this book. They include citations I found interesting or enlightening or particularly well-written. In some cases, I’ve pointed out which of these applies to which citation; in others, I have not. Any benefit you gain from reading these notes is purely incidental to the purpose they serve of reminding me what I once read. Please see Wikipedia for a summary if I’ve failed to provide one sufficient for your purposes. If my notes serve to trigger an interest in this book, then I’m happy for you.

This book is written from the point of view of a young German named Paul Bäumer, who fights at the German/French front during WWI. Over the course of the book, the harsh world in which he finds himself hones his cynicism, makes him more jaded.

We meet Paul at the front, having already acclimated there with his colleagues, Albert Kropp, a former schoolmate from his hometown; Haie Westhus, a hulking young man; Friedrich Müller, another classmate of Paul’s, more interested in book learning than the others; Stanislaus Katczinsky, an older reservist with a ton of experience and a nearly unmatched penchant for survival; and Tjaden, a young man with a prodigious appetite: Detering, a simple farmer boy; Kantorek, the former schoolmaster and fervent supporter of the war; and, finally, Himmelstoss, the former-postmaster-turned-corporal who tormented them all during basic training.

At the front, they engage in the nearly unutterable filthiness and desolation of trench warfare, moving a few meters back and forth each day. They are all dulled by a lack of rations, but almost more by a lack of sleep.

“Katczinsky hat recht: es wäre alles nicht so schlimm mit dem Krieg, wenn man nur mehr Schlaf haben würde. Vorne ist es doch nie etwas damit, und vierzehn Tage jedesmal sind eine lange Zeit.”
Position 20-21

A common theme is that the people at home don’t understand at all what it’s like at the front. They are too quick to judge those that try to avoid the fight or to flee.

“[…] wußten wir bereits, daß die Todesangst stärker ist. Wir wurden darum keine Meuterer, keine Deserteure, keine Feiglinge – alle diese Ausdrücke waren ihnen ja so leicht zur Hand […]”
Position 113-116

Confronted with a battlefield filled with the dead, wounded and barely surviving in a roiled sea of mud, blood, and oil, … who can blame them for “forgetting” what they were fighting for, for “forgetting” the people at home and their desire for “victory”?

“Die Gewehre verkrusten, die Uniformen verkrusten, alles ist fließend und aufgelöst, eine triefende, feuchte, ölige Masse Erde, in der die gelben Tümpel mit spiralig roten Blutlachen stehen und Tote, Verwundete und Überlebende langsam versinken.”
Position 2410-2412

For the young, the war becomes all they’ve ever known. Their days in school are finished. When—if—they return, they’ll have nothing to return to. The older soldiers still have a families and jobs—they have some other routine to which they can yearn to return. The young don’t even that that. They become fatalistic without even the years of experience needed to master the philosophy.

“Der Krieg hat uns weggeschwemmt. Für die andern, die älteren, ist er eine Unterbrechung, sie können über ihn hinausdenken.”
Position 171-173

They think about what life will be like after, should they survive the war, about having spent two years away from a home that they will no longer recognize as their own.

“Kropp denkt ebenfalls darüber nach. »Es wird überhaupt schwer werden mit uns allen. Ob die sich in der Heimat eigentlich nicht manchmal Sorgen machen deswegen? Zwei Jahre Schießen und Handgranaten – das kann man doch nicht ausziehen wie einen Strumpf nachher.«”
Position 732-734

They know how senseless their survival is, that with being clever and careful they can only improve very long odds. Fortune is the final arbiter.

“Jeder Soldat bleibt nur durch tausend Zufälle am Leben. Und jeder Soldat glaubt und vertraut dem Zufall.”
Position 842-842

That’s not to say that experience counts for nothing.

“Der Stellungskampf von heute erfordert Kenntnisse und Erfahrungen, man muß Verständnis für das Gelände haben, man muß die Geschosse, ihre Geräusche und Wirkungen im Ohr haben, man muß vorausbestimmen können, wo sie einbauen, wie sie streuen und wie man sich schützt. Dieser junge Ersatz weiß natürlich von alledem noch fast gar nichts.”
Position 1104-1106

They spend long nights in wet holes in the ground. They watch fog rise from craters like ghosts. They see fields of uncollected corpses bloating in the heat. They starve, they dehydrate, they freeze. They watch deadly chloroform gas creep over the fields, fingering every crevasse with its tendrils.

From this, they suddenly return to camp and “normality”, knowing that a return to the madness and misery of the front is inevitable.

“Alles ist Gewohnheit, auch der Schützengraben. Diese Gewohnheit ist der Grund dafür, daß wir scheinbar so rasch vergessen. Vorgestern waren wir noch im Feuer, heute machen wir Albernheiten und fechten uns durch die Gegend, morgen gehen wir wieder in den Graben.”
Position 1175-1176

Paul loses the first of his comrades, watching him die in a hospital bed, getting thinner and thinner.

“[…] die Stirn wölbt sich stärker, die Backenknochen stehen vor. Das Skelett arbeitet sich durch. Die Augen versinken schon. In ein paar Stunden wird es vorbei sein.”
Position 245-248

He and his company are assigned to guard duty for a month, guarding emaciated and surly Russian prisoners of war.

They will do nearly anything to eat good food. At one point, Paul and Kat hole up in a shed with a couple of roast chickens in one of the only truly wholesome scenes in the book.

Later, when the company is assigned to guard duty for a small town, they live high on the hog. One day, he and his comrades put together a grand meal, but the smoke from the fire attracts enemies. They continue cooking during the attack, loath to leave their supper behind. “Doch das Pufferbacken wird jetzt schwieriger.”

The boys take revenge on their former DI Himmelstoss when he is finally assigned to the front—and no longer has any true power over them. They sneak across a river to spend a night with some willing French girls, fraternizing with the “enemy”.

He describes a horse dying on the battlefield, completely unaware of what has happened to it, scrabbling its way forward in its life blindly—a metaphor for many of the soldiers who fall in a similarly senseless fashion.

“Das letzte stemmt [Pferd] sich auf die Vorderbeine und dreht sich im Kreise wie ein Karussell, sitzend dreht es sich auf den hochgestemmten Vorderbeinen im Kreise, wahrscheinlich ist der Rücken zerschmettert. Der Soldat rennt hin und schießt es nieder. Langsam, demütig rutscht es zu Boden.”
Position 538-540

Juxtaposed with the death of the horses is the equally senseless death of a young recruit (der “kleine Rekrut[…] mit der Wunde”), who’d only just gotten to the front on the same day that he had his entire waist destroyed by shrapnel. He was not going to survive. It was up to the boys to decide whether to prolong his suffering with a fruitless trip to the field hospital, where he would die—or, whether they would put him out his misery themselves. The miserable scene takes place in pouring rain.

“Monoton pendeln die Wagen, monoton sind die Rufe, monoton rinnt der Regen. Er rinnt auf unsere Köpfe und auf die Köpfe der Toten vorn, auf den Körper des kleinen Rekruten mit der Wunde, die viel zu groß für seine Hüfte ist, er rinnt auf das Grab Kemmerichs, er rinnt auf unsere Herzen.”
Position 628-630

On leave, he returns to his mother and his sister, who hesitantly ask him how it is, in the war. He lies, of course. How can he begin to explain to them what it’s really like? Their worlds have drifted apart, likely irreparably.

“Mutter, was soll ich dir darauf antworten! Du wirst es nicht verstehen und nie begreifen. Du sollst es auch nie begreifen. War es schlimm, fragst du. – Du, Mutter. – Ich schüttele den Kopf und sage:»Nein, Mutter, nicht so sehr. Wir sind ja mit vielen zusammen, da ist es nicht so schlimm.«”
Position 1376-1378

In his hometown for a few days, he already has PTSD. He hears the whistling of grenades in the squeal of tram wheels.

“[…] das Quietschen der Straßenbahnen sich wie heranheulende Granaten anhört […]”
Position 1416-1418

As with so many other soldiers of other wars in the century since this book was written, he regrets having come “home”. It is a reminder of how he no longer fits in anything resembling normalcy. It makes him bitter for what he has lost, but also bitter at those who stayed behind, benefitting, however indirectly, from the unseen and largely unacknowledged sacrifices at the front.

“Ich hätte nie hierherkommen dürfen. […] Ich hätte nie auf Urlaub fahren dürfen.”
Position 1586-1588

Back at war and Paul considers how he and his comrades have come to be trapped here: by the whims of higher-ups who make decisions nearly wholly unaware of what is happening in the real world. Orders are orders and they all follow them. Those that follow them don’t understand why they were given; those that gave them don’t understand what they mean to those who follow them.

“An irgendeinem Tisch wird ein Schriftstück von einigen Leuten unterzeichnet, die keiner von uns kennt, und jahrelang ist unser höchstes Ziel das, worauf sonst die Verachtung der Welt und ihre höchste Strafe ruht.”
Position 1644-1646

Perhaps because they don’t care, but also, possibly, because they are incapable of bridging the divide. They are too far away, the situation too abstract for them to understand the ramifications. This does not excuse them; it explains how they can live with themselves. They are simply unaware of what they are doing, like a man stepping on ants. Their remove insulates them. Our goal should be to avoid making such callous decisions.

Back at the front, Paul gets turned around on a mission and spends a day and night in a foxhole alone, save for the corpse of a Frenchman he’d killed. The man had jumped blindly into the same foxhole to escape the same gas that kills Frenchman and German alike.

“Jetzt sehe ich erst, daß du ein Mensch bist wie ich. Ich habe gedacht an deine Handgranaten, an dein Bajonett und deine Waffen – jetzt sehe ich deine Frau und dein Gesicht und das Gemeinsame. Vergib mir, Kamerad! Wir sehen es immerzu spät. Warum sagt man uns nicht immer wieder, daß ihr ebenso arme Hunde seid wie wir […]”
Position 1893-1900

When they escape the front, the troops ride on top of a wagon loaded with goods—“[z]wischen uns steht ein Papageienkäfig, den wir für die Katze gefunden haben”—but there isn’t room for everyone. There are countless internally displaced persons—families who’ve lost their homes and everything but their lives—and they walk in the mud, with lowered eyes and, more often than not, nothing more than the clothes on their backs.

“Ihre Gestalten sind gebeugt, ihre Gesichter voll Kummer, Verzweiflung, Hast und Ergebenheit. Die Kinder hängen an den Händen der Mütter, manchmal führt auch ein älteres Mädchen die Kleinen, die vorwärts taumeln und immer wieder zurücksehen. Einige tragen armselige Puppen mit sich. Alle schweigen, als sie an uns vorübergehen.”
Position 2027-2029

Those that remain of the company end up in a hospital, far from the front, nursing their egregious but not hopeless wounds. The hospital has many, many patients, nearly all in worse shape than Paul. He lists them all, finishing with his usual sardonic flair.

“Im Stockwerk tiefer liegen Bauch- und Rückenmarkschüsse, Kopfschüsse und beiderseitig Amputierte. Rechts im Flügel Kieferschüsse, Gaskranke, Nasen-, Ohren- und Halsschüsse. Links im Flügel Blinde und Lungenschüsse, Beckenschüsse, Gelenkschüsse, Nierenschüsse, Hodenschüsse, Magenschüsse. Man sieht hier erst, wo ein Mensch überall getroffen werden kann.
Position 2217-2219

The war is not done with him, though. He heals. He returns to the front, but the German effort is unraveling, no longer even capable of pretending to support its cannon fodder. The English and American troops seem overwhelming, better armed, better fed. At this point, Paul is fully jaded, knowing that the factory owners back at home are growing fat on profit while the soldiers at the front tighten their belts over bellies empty of everything but a thin flour soup.

“Wir aber sind mager und ausgehungert. Unser Essen ist so schlecht und mit so viel Ersatzmitteln gestreckt, daß wir krank davon werden. Die Fabrikbesitzer in Deutschland sind reiche Leute geworden – uns zerschrinnt die Ruhr die Därme. […]”
Position 2354-2358

And still Germany manages to find more bodies to send to the front. The hardened troops look with nonjudgmental and even gaze upon the fresh troops that arrive, inexperienced and untrained, they only know how to die. There are thousands of these, in ill-fitting uniforms—none were designed for such small frames—and hollow-eyed from a hunger that has reached from the front deep into Germany itself.

“»Deutschland muß bald leer sein«, sagt Kat.”
Position 2361-2362

This was to be Kat’s final joke. He soon died of a grievous head wound, despite Paul’s heroic fireman’s carry across a live battlefield. He’d thought Kat had only a shattered shin, having overlooked the pinhole in his skull that ended him.

The title of the book comes from a report issued on the day the war finally took Paul. The author notes with cruel irony that on this day,

“[…] der Heeresbericht sich nur auf den Satz beschränkt[…], im Westen sei nichts Neues zu melden.”
Position 2473-2474

Citations

“Katczinsky hat recht: es wäre alles nicht so schlimm mit dem Krieg, wenn man nur mehr Schlaf haben würde. Vorne ist es doch nie etwas damit, und vierzehn Tage jedesmal sind eine lange Zeit.”
Position 20-21
“Es ist übrigens komisch, daß das Unglück der Welt so oft von kleinen Leuten herrührt, sie sind viel energischer und unverträglicher als großgewachsene.”
Position 91-93
“[…] während sie den Dienst am Staate als das Größte bezeichneten, wußten wir bereits, daß die Todesangst stärker ist. Wir wurden darum keine Meuterer, keine Deserteure, keine Feiglinge – alle diese Ausdrücke waren ihnen ja so leicht zur Hand -, wir liebten unsere Heimat genauso wie sie, und wir gingen bei jedem Angriff mutig vor; – aber wir unterschieden jetzt, wir hatten mit einem Male sehen gelernt. Und wir sahen, daß nichts von ihrer Welt übrig blieb. Wir waren plötzlich auf furchtbare Weise allein; – und wir mußten allein damit fertig werden.”
Position 113-116
“Wir waren noch nicht eingewurzelt. Der Krieg hat uns weggeschwemmt. Für die andern, die älteren, ist er eine Unterbrechung, sie können über ihn hinausdenken. Wir aber sind von ihm ergriffen worden und wissen nicht, wie das enden soll.”
Position 171-173
“Wir lernten, daß ein geputzter Knopf wichtiger ist als vier Bände Schopenhauer. Zuerst erstaunt, dann erbittert und schließlich gleichgültig erkannten wir, daß nicht der Geist ausschlaggebend zu sein schien, sondern die Wichsbürste, nicht der Gedanke, sondern das System, nicht die Freiheit, sondern der Drill.”
Position 184-187
“Er liegt eine Zeitlang still. Dann sagt er:»Du kannst meine Schnürschuhe für Müller mitnehmen.« Ich nicke und denke nach, was ich ihm Aufmunterndes sagen kann. Seine Lippen sind weggewischt, sein Mund ist größer geworden, die Zähne stechen hervor, als wären sie aus Kreide. Das Fleisch zerschmilzt, die Stirn wölbt sich stärker, die Backenknochen stehen vor. Das Skelett arbeitet sich durch. Die Augen versinken schon. In ein paar Stunden wird es vorbei sein.”
Position 245-248
“Eine Stunde vergeht. Ich sitze gespannt und beobachte jede seiner Mienen, ob er vielleicht noch etwas sagen möchte. Wenn er doch den Mund auftun und schreien wollte! Aber er weint nur, den Kopf zur Seite gewandt. Er spricht nicht von seiner Mutter und seinen Geschwistern, er sagt nichts, es liegt wohl schon hinter ihm; – er ist jetzt allein mit seinem kleinen neunzehnjährigen Leben und weint, weil es ihn verläßt.”
Position 270-273
“Die Abschüsse sind deutlich zu hören. Es sind die englischen Batterien, rechts von unserm Abschnitt. Sie beginnen eine Stunde zu früh. Bei uns fingen sie immer erst Punkt zehn Uhr an. »Was fällt denn denen ein«, ruft Müller,»ihre Uhren gehen wohl vor.«”
Position 441-442
“Wenn Kat vor den Baracken steht und sagt:»Es gibt Kattun -«, so ist das eben seine Meinung, fertig; – wenn er es aber hier sagt, so hat der Satz eine Schärfe wie ein Bajonett nachts im Mond, er schneidet glatt durch die Gedanken, er ist näher und spricht zu diesem Unbewußten, das in uns aufgewacht ist, mit einer dunklen Bedeutung,»es gibt Kattun«-.”
Position 452-454
“Es ist das andere gewesen, diese hellsichtige Witterung in uns, die uns niedergerissen und gerettet hat, ohne daß man weiß, wie. Wenn sie nicht wäre, gäbe es von Flandern bis zu den Vogesen schon längst keine Menschen mehr.”
Position 468-469
“Das sind die verwundeten Pferde. Aber nicht alle. Einige galoppieren weiter entfernt, brechen nieder und rennen weiter. Einem ist der Bauch aufgerissen, die Gedärme hängen lang heraus. Es verwickelt sich darin und stürzt, doch es steht wieder auf.”
Position 530-532
“Das letzte stemmt sich auf die Vorderbeine und dreht sich im Kreise wie ein Karussell, sitzend dreht es sich auf den hochgestemmten Vorderbeinen im Kreise, wahrscheinlich ist der Rücken zerschmettert. Der Soldat rennt hin und schießt es nieder. Langsam, demütig rutscht es zu Boden.”
Position 538-540
“Der Zaun ist verwüstet, die Schienen der Feldbahn drüben sind aufgerissen, sie starren hochgebogen in die Luft.”
Position 601-602
“Der Junge wird den Transport kaum überstehen, und höchstens kann es noch einige Tage mit ihm dauern. Alles bisher aber wird nichts sein gegen diese Zeit, bis er stirbt. Jetzt ist er noch betäubt und fühlt nichts. In einer Stunde wird er ein kreischendes Bündel unerträglicher Schmerzen werden. Die Tage, die er noch leben kann, bedeuten für ihn eine einzige rasende Qual. Und wem nützt es, ob er sie noch hat oder nicht – Ich nicke. »Ja, Kat, man sollte einen Revolver nehmen.«”
Position 614-617
“Monoton pendeln die Wagen, monoton sind die Rufe, monoton rinnt der Regen. Er rinnt auf unsere Köpfe und auf die Köpfe der Toten vorn, auf den Körper des kleinen Rekruten mit der Wunde, die viel zu groß für seine Hüfte ist, er rinnt auf das Grab Kemmerichs, er rinnt auf unsere Herzen.”
Position 628-630
“Aber niemand hat uns in der Schule beigebracht, wie man bei Regen und Sturm eine Zigarette anzündet, wie man ein Feuer aus nassem Holz machen kann – oder daß man ein Bajonett am besten in den Bauch stößt, weil es da nicht festklemmt wie bei den Rippen.”
Position 715-717
“Kropp denkt ebenfalls darüber nach. »Es wird überhaupt schwer werden mit uns allen. Ob die sich in der Heimat eigentlich nicht manchmal Sorgen machen deswegen? Zwei Jahre Schießen und Handgranaten – das kann man doch nicht ausziehen wie einen Strumpf nachher.«”
Position 732-734
“Wir sind zwei Menschen, zwei winzige Funken Leben, draußen ist die Nacht und der Kreis des Todes. Wir sitzen an ihrem Rande, gefährdet und geborgen, […]”
Position 797-798
“Auch die andern machen Witze, unbehagliche Witze, was sollen wir sonst tun. – Die Särge sind ja tatsächlich für uns. In solchen Dingen klappt die Organisation.”
Position 827-828
“Die Front ist ein Käfig, in dem man nervös warten muß auf das, was geschehen wird. Wir liegen unter dem Gitter der Granatenbogen und leben in der Spannung des Ungewissen.Über uns schwebt der Zufall. Wenn ein Geschoß kommt, kann ich mich ducken, das ist alles; wohin es schlägt, kann ich weder genau wissen noch beeinflussen. Dieser Zufall ist es, der uns gleichgültig macht.”
Position 835-838
“Jeder Soldat bleibt nur durch tausend Zufälle am Leben. Und jeder Soldat glaubt und vertraut dem Zufall.”
Position 842-842
“Nach wenigen Minuten hören wir das erste Schlurfen und Zerren. Es verstärkt sich, nun sind es viele kleine Füße. Da blitzen die Taschenlampen auf, und alles schlägt auf den schwarzen Haufen ein, der auseinanderzischt. Der Erfolg ist gut. Wir schaufeln die Rattenteile über den Grabenrand und legen uns wieder auf die Lauer. Noch einige Male gelingt uns der Schlag. Dann haben die Tiere etwas gemerkt oder das Blut gerochen. Sie kommen nicht mehr.”
Position 852-855
“Ich stürze hinter dem Flüchtenden her und überlege, ob ich ihm in die Beine schießen soll; – da pfeift es heran, ich werfe mich hin, und als ich aufstehe, ist die Grabenwand mit heißen Splittern, Fleischfetzen und Uniformlappen bepflastert. Ich klettere zurück.”
Position 929-930
“Noch eine Nacht. Wir sind jetzt stumpf vor Spannung. Es ist eine tödliche Spannung, die wie ein schartiges Messer unser Rückenmark entlang kratzt. Die Beine wollen nicht mehr, die Hände zittern, der Körper ist eine dünne Haut über mühsam unterdrücktem Wahnsinn, über einem gleich hemmungslos ausbrechendem Gebrüll ohne Ende.”
Position 935-937
“Die Nacht kommt, aus den Trichtern steigen Nebel. Es sieht aus, als wären die Löcher von gespenstigen Geheimnissen erfüllt. Der weiße Dunst kriecht angstvoll umher, ehe er wagt, über den Rand hinwegzugleiten. Dann ziehen lange Streifen von Trichter zu Trichter.”
Position 1003-1005
“Und selbst wenn man sie uns wiedergäbe, diese Landschaft unserer Jugend, wir würden wenig mehr mit ihr anzufangen wissen. Die zarten und geheimen Kräfte, die von ihr zu uns gingen, können nicht wiedererstehen. Wir würden in ihr sein und in ihr umgehen; wir würden uns erinnern und sie lieben und bewegt sein von ihrem Anblick. Aber es wäre das gleiche, wie wenn wir nachdenklich werden vor der Fotografie eines toten Kameraden; es sind seine Züge, es ist sein Gesicht, und die Tage, die wir mit ihm zusammen waren, gewinnen ein trügerisches Leben in unserer Erinnerung; aber er ist es nicht selbst.”
Position 1033-1037
“Die Tage sind heiß, und die Toten liegen unbeerdigt. Wir können sie nicht alle holen, wir wissen nicht, wohin wir mit ihnen sollen. Sie werden von den Granaten beerdigt. Manchen treiben die Bäuche auf wie Ballons. Sie zischen, rülpsen und bewegen sich. Das Gas rumort in ihnen. Der Himmel ist blau und ohne Wolken. Abends wird es schwül, und die Hitze steigt aus der Erde. Wenn der Wind zu uns herüberweht, bringt er den Blutdunst mit, der schwer und widerwärtig süßlich ist, diesen Totenbrodem der Trichter, der aus Chloroform und Verwesung gemischt scheint und uns Übelkeiten und Erbrechen verursacht.”
Position 1070-1074
“Der Stellungskampf von heute erfordert Kenntnisse und Erfahrungen, man muß Verständnis für das Gelände haben, man muß die Geschosse, ihre Geräusche und Wirkungen im Ohr haben, man muß vorausbestimmen können, wo sie einbauen, wie sie streuen und wie man sich schützt. Dieser junge Ersatz weiß natürlich von alledem noch fast gar nichts.”
Position 1104-1106
“Er wird aufgerieben, weil er kaum ein Schrapnell von einer Granate unterscheiden kann, die Leute werden weggemäht, weil sie angstvoll auf das Heulen der ungefährlichen großen, weit hinten einhauenden Kohlenkästen lauschen und das pfeifende, leise Surren der flach zerspritzenden kleinen Biester überhören.”
Position 1106-1108
“Sie tragen ihre grauen Röcke und Hosen und Stiefel, aber den meisten ist die Uniform zu weit, sie schlottert um die Glieder, die Schultern sind zu schmal, die Körper sind zu gering, es gab keine Uniformen, die für dieses Kindermaß eingerichtet waren.”
Position 1114-1116
“Haie Westhus wird mit abgerissenem Rücken fortgeschleppt; bei jedem Atemzug pulst die Lunge durch die Wunde. Ich kann ihm noch die Hand drücken; -»is alle, Paul«, stöhnt er und beißt sich vor Schmerz in die Arme.”
Position 1146-1147
“Alles ist Gewohnheit, auch der Schützengraben. Diese Gewohnheit ist der Grund dafür, daß wir scheinbar so rasch vergessen. Vorgestern waren wir noch im Feuer, heute machen wir Albernheiten und fechten uns durch die Gegend, morgen gehen wir wieder in den Graben.”
Position 1175-1176
“Das Grauen der Front versinkt, wenn wir ihm den Rücken kehren, wir gehen ihm mit gemeinen und grimmigen Witzen zuleibe; wenn jemand stirbt, dann heißt es, daß er den Arsch zugekniffen hat, und so reden wir über alles, das rettet uns vor dem Verrücktwerden, solange wir es so nehmen, leisten wir Widerstand.”
Position 1188-1190
“Und ich weiß: all das, was jetzt, solange wir im Kriege sind, versackt in uns wie ein Stein, wird nach dem Kriege wieder aufwachen, und dann beginnt erst die Auseinandersetzung auf Leben und Tod.”
Position 1193-1194
“Wir trinken Punsch und lügen uns phantastische Erlebnisse vor. Jeder glaubt dem andern gern und wartet ungeduldig, um noch dicker aufzutrumpfen.”
Position 1239-1240
“Mutter, was soll ich dir darauf antworten! Du wirst es nicht verstehen und nie begreifen. Du sollst es auch nie begreifen. War es schlimm, fragst du. – Du, Mutter. – Ich schüttele den Kopf und sage:»Nein, Mutter, nicht so sehr. Wir sind ja mit vielen zusammen, da ist es nicht so schlimm.«”
Position 1376-1378
“Nachdem ich mich auf der Straße ein paarmal erschreckt habe, weil das Quietschen der Straßenbahnen sich wie heranheulende Granaten anhört, klopft mir jemand auf die Schulter.”
Position 1416-1418
“Ich hätte nie hierherkommen dürfen. Ich war gleichgültig und oft hoffnungslos draußen; – ich werde es nie mehr so sein können. Ich war ein Soldat, und nun bin ich nichts mehr als Schmerz um mich, um meine Mutter, um alles, was so trostlos und ohne Ende ist. Ich hätte nie auf Urlaub fahren dürfen.”
Position 1586-1588
“Dieses dünne, trübe, schmutzige Wasser ist das Ziel der Gefangenen. Sie schöpfen es gierig aus den stinkenden Tonnen und tragen es unter ihren Blusen fort.”
Position 1611-1612
“Ein Befehl hat diese stillen Gestalten zu unsern Feinden gemacht; ein Befehl könnte sie in unsere Freunde verwandeln. An irgendeinem Tisch wird ein Schriftstück von einigen Leuten unterzeichnet, die keiner von uns kennt, und jahrelang ist unser höchstes Ziel das, worauf sonst die Verachtung der Welt und ihre höchste Strafe ruht.”
Position 1644-1646

“»Ja, nun«, meint Albert, und ich sehe ihm an, daß er mich in die Enge treiben will,

“»aber unsere Professoren und Pastöre und Zeitungen sagen, nur wir hätten recht, und das wird ja hoffentlich auch so sein; – aber die französischen Professoren und Pastöre und Zeitungen behaupten, nur sie hätten recht, wie steht es denn damit?«”

Position 1722-1724

“»Weshalb ist dann überhaupt Krieg?« fragt Tjaden.
Kat zuckt die Achseln. »Es muß Leute geben, denen der Krieg nützt.«
»Na, ich gehöre nicht dazu«, grinst Tjaden.
»Du nicht, und keiner hier.«
»Wer denn nur?« beharrte Tjaden. »Dem Kaiser nützt er doch auch nicht. Der hat doch alles, was er braucht.«”

Position 1737-1740
“Das Ganze kann nicht lange her sein, das Blut ist noch frisch. Da alle Leute, die wir sehen, tot sind, lassen wir uns nicht aufhalten, sondern melden die Sache bei der nächsten Sanitätsstation. Schließlich ist es ja auch nicht unsere Angelegenheit, diesen Tragbahrenhengsten die Arbeit abzunehmen.”
Position 1763-1765
“Immer noch habe ich Angst, aber es ist eine vernünftige Angst, eine außerordentlich gesteigerte Vorsicht. Die Nacht ist windig, und Schatten gehen hin und her beim Aufflackern des Mündungsfeuers. Man sieht dadurch zu wenig und zu viel.”
Position 1801-1802
“Klirren wird hörbar. Ein einzelner Schrei gellend dazwischen.”
Position 1827-1828
“Der Tote hätte sicher noch dreißig Jahre leben können, wenn ich mir den Rückweg schärfer eingeprägt hätte. Wenn er zwei Meter weiter nach links gelaufen wäre, läge er jetzt drüben im Graben und schriebe einen neuen Brief an seine Frau.”
Position 1890-1891
“»Kamerad, ich wollte dich nicht töten. Sprängst du noch einmal hier hinein, ich täte es nicht, wenn auch du vernünftig wärest. Aber du warst mir vorher nur ein Gedanke, eine Kombination, die in meinem Gehirn lebte und einen Entschluß hervorrief – diese Kombination habe ich erstochen. Jetzt sehe ich erst, daß du ein Mensch bist wie ich. Ich habe gedacht an deine Handgranaten, an dein Bajonett und deine Waffen – jetzt sehe ich deine Frau und dein Gesicht und das Gemeinsame. Vergib mir, Kamerad! Wir sehen es immerzu spät. Warum sagt man uns nicht immer wieder, daß ihr ebenso arme Hunde seid wie wir, daß eure Mütter sich ebenso ängstigen wie unsere und daß wir die gleiche Furcht vor dem Tode haben und das gleiche Sterben und den gleichen Schmerz -. Vergib mir, Kamerad, wie konntest du mein Feind sein. Wenn wir diese Waffen und diese Uniform fortwerfen, könntest du ebenso mein Bruder sein wie Kat und Albert. Nimm zwanzig Jahre von mir, Kamerad, und stehe auf – nimm mehr, denn ich weiß nicht, was ich damit beginnen soll.«”
Position 1893-1900
“Ich habe den Buchdrucker Gérard Duval getötet. Ich muß Buchdrucker werden, denke ich ganz verwirrt, Buchdrucker werden, Buchdrucker”
Position 1919-1920
“Doch das Pufferbacken wird jetzt schwieriger. Die Einschläge kommen so dicht, daß oft und öfter die Splitter gegen die Hauswand klatschen und durch die Fenster fegen. Jedesmal, wenn ich ein Ding heranpfeifen höre, gehe ich mit der Pfanne und den Puffern in die Knie und ducke mich hinter die Fenstermauer. Sofort danach bin ich wieder hoch und backe weiter.”
Position 1986-1989
“Zwischen uns steht ein Papageienkäfig, den wir für die Katze gefunden haben. Sie wird mitgenommen und liegt drinnen vor ihrem Fleischnapf und schnurrt. Langsam rollen die Wagen über die Straße. Wir singen. Hinter uns spritzen die Granaten Fontänen aus dem nun ganz verlassenen Dorf.”
Position 2023-2025
“Ihre Gestalten sind gebeugt, ihre Gesichter voll Kummer, Verzweiflung, Hast und Ergebenheit. Die Kinder hängen an den Händen der Mütter, manchmal führt auch ein älteres Mädchen die Kleinen, die vorwärts taumeln und immer wieder zurücksehen. Einige tragen armselige Puppen mit sich. Alle schweigen, als sie an uns vorübergehen.”
Position 2027-2029
“Ich kann noch etwas kriechen und rufe einen vorüberfahrenden Leiterwagen an, der uns mitnimmt. Er ist voller Verwundeter. Ein Sanitätsgefreiter ist dabei, der uns eine Tetanusspritze in die Brust jagt.”
Position 2046-2047
“Im Stockwerk tiefer liegen Bauch- und Rückenmarkschüsse, Kopfschüsse und beiderseitig Amputierte. Rechts im Flügel Kieferschüsse, Gaskranke, Nasen-, Ohren- und Halsschüsse. Links im Flügel Blinde und Lungenschüsse, Beckenschüsse, Gelenkschüsse, Nierenschüsse, Hodenschüsse, Magenschüsse. Man sieht hier erst, wo ein Mensch überall getroffen werden kann.”
Position 2217-2219
“[…] wir sind kleine Flammen, notdürftig geschützt durch schwache Wände vor dem Sturm der Auflösung und der Sinnlosigkeit, in dem wir flackern und manchmal fast ertrinken. Dann wird das gedämpfte Brausen der Schlacht zu einem Ring, der uns einschließt, wir kriechen in uns zusammen und starren mit großen Augen in die Nacht.”
Position 2308-2311
“Unser Maschinengewehr bestreicht den vorderen Halbkreis. Das Kühlwasser verdampft, wir reichen die Kästen eilig herum, jeder pißt hinein, so haben wir wieder Wasser und können weiterfeuern.”
Position 2336-2338
“Wir haben Müller zwar begraben können, aber lange wird er wohl nicht ungestört bleiben. Unsere Linien werden zurückgenommen. Es gibt drüben zu viele frische englische und amerikanische Regimenter. Es gibt zuviel Corned beef und weißes Weizenmehl. Und zuviel neue Geschütze. Zuviel Flugzeuge.”
Position 2352-2353
“Wir aber sind mager und ausgehungert. Unser Essen ist so schlecht und mit so viel Ersatzmitteln gestreckt, daß wir krank davon werden. Die Fabrikbesitzer in Deutschland sind reiche Leute geworden – uns zerschrinnt die Ruhr die Därme. Die Latrinenstangen sind stets dicht gehockt voll; – man sollte den Leuten zu Hause diese grauen, gelben, elenden, ergebenen Gesichter hier zeigen, diese verkrümmten Gestalten, denen die Kolik das Blut aus dem Leibe quetscht und die höchstens mit verzerrten, noch schmerz-bebenden Lippen sich angrinsen:»Es hat gar keinen Zweck, die Hose wieder hochzuziehen -«”
Position 2354-2358
“Unsere frischen Truppen sind blutarme, erholungsbedürftige Knaben, die keinen Tornister tragen können, aber zu sterben wissen. Zu Tausenden. Sie verstehen nichts vom Kriege, sie gehen nur vor und lassen sich abschießen. Ein einziger Flieger knallte aus Spaß zwei Kompanien von ihnen weg, ehe sie etwas von Deckung wußten, als sie frisch aus dem Zuge kamen.”
Position 2359-2361
“»Deutschland muß bald leer sein«, sagt Kat.”
Position 2361-2362

“Kat erzählt eine der Geschichten, die die ganze Front von den Vogesen bis Flandern entlanglaufen, – von dem Stabsarzt, der Namen vorliest auf der Musterung und, wenn der Mann vortritt, ohne aufzusehen, sagt:

“»K. v. Wir brauchen Soldaten draußen.«

“Ein Mann mit Holzbein tritt vor, der Stabsarzt sagt wieder: k.v.

“-»Und da«, Kat hebt die Stimme,»sagt der Mann zu ihm: ›Ein Holzbein habe ich schon; aber wenn ich jetzt hinausgehe und wenn man mir den Kopf abschießt, dann lasse ich mir einen Holzkopf machen und werde Stabsarzt!‹«”

Position 2365-2369

This is like the story of the doctor on the witness stand who’s asked whether his patient, whose head had been chopped off, was still capable. He responded that he supposed the corpse still had the wherewithal to become a lawyer.

“Wir sind nicht geschlagen, denn wir sind als Soldaten besser und erfahrener; wir sind einfach von der vielfachen Übermacht zerdrückt und zurückgeschoben.”
Position 2407-2408
“Die Gewehre verkrusten, die Uniformen verkrusten, alles ist fließend und aufgelöst, eine triefende, feuchte, ölige Masse Erde, in der die gelben Tümpel mit spiralig roten Blutlachen stehen und Tote, Verwundete und Überlebende langsam versinken.”
Position 2410-2412
“Kat hat, ohne daß ich es bemerkt habe, unterwegs einen Splitter in den Kopf bekommen. Nur ein kleines Loch ist da, es muß ein ganz geringer, verirrter Splitter gewesen sein. Aber er hat ausgereicht. Kat ist tot.”
Position 2448-2449
“Er fiel im Oktober 1918, an einem Tage, der so ruhig und still war an der ganzen Front, daß der Heeresbericht sich nur auf den Satz beschränkte, im Westen sei nichts Neues zu melden.”
Position 2473-2474